Logo

Riders on the Storm - book launch - Shared screen with speaker view
Alison Phipps
08:36
Hi Everyone and welcome to Alastair McIntosh’s Riders on the Storm book chat and book launch. Published today by Berlin
Alison Phipps
09:39
The event is organised by Berlin and Co-Hosted by Centre for Human Ecology (Luke Devlin) and Climate Fringe (Kat Jones) with UNESCO Chair for Refugee Integration at University of Glasgow
Lucy Mertekis
12:56
LINKS FOR THIS BOOK:1) Buy your copy direct from Birlinn: https://bit.ly/BirlinnRiders (includes overseas)2) Opus Earth video of the book (5 mins): https://bit.ly/riders-storm-video3) Centre for Human Ecology reading group, 7 pm each Thursday in September: https://bit.ly/RidersCHE4) Climate Fringe’s diary of events for COP26: https://climatefringe.org/
Diana Toynbee
30:24
Great commentary!
Mairi McFadyen
30:57
I’ve never been in a zoom call so big!!
Diana Toynbee
30:59
176
David Coleman
31:01
First furlong…. coming up to Beecher’s Brook…
Joe Lafferty
31:16
Hi Marie McF how’s Inverness?
Amreeta Graham
31:32
Hi Alastair!
Marian Pallister
31:36
Coming into the last straight…
Mairi McFadyen
31:43
Oh hi Joe! It’s great thanks - very green! Loch looking lovely. How are you?
Enid Langbert
31:46
It is raining in New York.
Jen Stout
31:52
Hello from balmy Levenwick, Shetland.
Marian Pallister
31:53
VERY sunny and hot in Argyll.
Réamonn Ó Ciaráin
31:54
Hi all - Réamonn here in sunny Armagh.
Martin Johnstone
31:57
It never rains in Glasgow
Sarah Ogletree
31:58
A beautiful day in North Carolina USA!
Luke Concannon
32:00
Vermont says hi!
Kevin Frediani
32:01
Hello from Abernethy - where its been a lovely day
Mairéad Nic Craith
32:03
There’s more than one on some computers. It’s gorgeous in Arbroath!
Iain Mackenzie
32:05
Hi Alastair, fitlike?
Patricia Watts
32:06
Sunny and warm in Santa Fe, New Mexico
Margaret Sutherland
32:08
Ha ha ha Martin!!!
Nick Wilding
32:15
overcast in fife
Diana Toynbee
32:17
muggy in Hereford
Christine Redhead
32:18
It's not raining in Devon
Evan Harrel
32:20
greetings from Montauk, NY, USA
Mary MacCallum Sullivan
32:31
Gorgeous in Argyll
Iain Mackenzie
32:45
Haaaary in Auld Reekie
Fiona Haworth
32:49
Hot and humid in Norwich
Simon Barrow
32:53
It’s dreary in Dunblane… but sunshine from this event!
Catriona MacDonald
32:54
not even raining in Aberdeen
fiona stokes
33:03
Loch Erisort on Lewis looking bright and blue tonight!
Hugh Hamilton
33:04
Dull in Moray
Leonard George
33:07
Greetings from Niagara on the Lake, Ontario, Canada
Catriona McIntosh
33:08
Overcast in York
Hugh Hamilton
33:12
yes
Chris Fremantle
33:13
Totally gorgeous in Ayr
Rosemary Robinson
33:14
hornsea, e yorkshire
Tom Rushby
33:21
stormy down in Southampton
Catherine Canning
33:25
Hi everyone - congrats Alastair! This is an important book. Love from Catherine and Scott
Graham Bryce
33:26
Glorious in Galloway 😎
Rachel Mccann
34:10
<3
David A. McKay
34:13
Sunny in Stockholm, Sweden!
Carol Bradley
34:27
Hot and humid in Nova Scotia, Canada. Wishing Alastair all the best, and thanks for another important book!
Kat Jones (SCCS)
35:38
www.climatefringe.org there’s a sign up for the monthly newsletter on the homepage
Nick Wilding
35:53
hola CHE and EDOC!
John Gillies
36:20
feasgar math bho Selkirk!!
Luke Devlin
36:25
can you unmute me please
Mairi McFadyen
36:42
Hi Luke!
Svenja Meyerricks
36:57
Lovely to see so many familiar CHE faces here! And others too of course!
David Somervell
37:47
Greetings, friends, from a very longtime CHE supporter!
José Luis Bermudez
38:11
Hola Nick :)) great to find you here !!!
Luke Devlin
38:43
Centre for Human Ecology reading group, 7 pm each Thursday in September: https://bit.ly/RidersCHE
Sarah Ogletree
39:27
Is the reading group something that folks from around the world could join as well?
Luke Devlin
39:45
yes absolutely Sarah
Sarah Ogletree
39:50
Wonderful!
Anna Munro
40:43
greetings from me too, another longstanding CHE friend
Anna Munro
41:18
thought my name would show there! Anna Munro in Edinburgh
Steven Willett
42:16
Alistair McIntosh gave a wonderful presentation last night at Canada Yearly Meeting (Quakers)Quaker Leadings and our Calling in these TimesIn the next few days it should become available at https://quaker.ca/yearlymeetinginsession/longer-schedule-description/ After about 30 days it will be on the Canada Yearly Meeting Vimeo page.I am joining from Salford, UK
David Somervell
46:09
Everyone might enjoy clicking on “Speaker View” in top right corner on a laptop.
Lucy Mertekis
52:25
Opus Earth video of the book (5 mins): https://bit.ly/riders-storm-video
Rona Wilkinson
54:18
OIl gas and PNG- destroyed it
Diana Toynbee
56:44
Do you think there is a problem with the language of 'deniers' and 'believers'?
Sarah Ogletree
01:04:28
I love that. Community as the answer.
Riaz Meer
01:05:02
Do you think Jason Moore's concept of the Capitalocene is important in addressing the problem?
Mairi McFadyen
01:05:30
Thank you Alastair
John Gillies
01:05:49
thank you very much Alastair.
Adam Howard
01:05:56
You have spoken, in the trailer for the book, of a collective trauma that leaves us vulnerable to exploitation and consumerism.If unattended trauma causes us to lose our power and to seek false security, how instead can we grow through trauma to become wise, strong and connected?
Simon Barrow
01:08:09
Our current democracies are premised own short-term thinking, and ‘the will of the people’ shaped by consumerism and the meeting of immediate needs. It has also been hollowed out by corporate dominance of political life. How do we reshape democracy so that the needs of the planet can be heard, and the populists/technocrats we currently elect don’t end up killing us and the earth?
nick stewart
01:08:59
Can we discuss CC without discussing capitalist concepts of growth, development and progress - and how we manifest these in our own lives. In other words, what does a sustainable life actually look like - private cars, cheap flights, globalized markets accessed at the click of a button - and so much more that we take for granted - are these things still acceptable as claims for our nice Western way of life?
Eric Conroy
01:09:34
Well said Simon!
David Somervell
01:14:24
Can we use the term Climate Disruption rather than Climate Change - the latter being something which is apparently just happening and the former that is something we might be threatened by / might wish to address? Just like the term should be Global Heating - rather than Global Warming?
Mary MacCallum Sullivan
01:15:11
So trauma and historical and intergenerational trauma is so much at the root of our global social dysfunction?
Patricia Watts
01:15:22
When the first colonial people arrived from Scotland, Ireland, England, they had come from several generations that endured the mini ice age. I think about how that impacted their personalities when they collided with the Native Americans.
Chris Fremantle
01:15:59
Alastair hinted at the idea of 7 generations, talking about the traumas…
Patricia Watts
01:17:16
I’m the seventh generation from my fourth great grandfather who fought in the Revolution in Virginia. Possibly Scottish.
Mary MacCallum Sullivan
01:17:43
The pornography of advertising is something I notice all the time!
Robert Woodford
01:18:08
Re short-term thinking and the need for longer term thinking in our politics and other systems, Roman Kyznaric’s insightful book (also just published) would complement Alastair’s well. https://www.romankrznaric.com/good-ancestor
Chris Fremantle
01:19:00
+++++
David Somervell
01:19:19
Recognition of the collective trauma leads to commend friends to the Climate Psychology Alliance - Scotland chapter where some of these concerns are being explored. Amusingly we are considered “International”! https://www.climatepsychologyalliance.org/international/366-cpa-scotland
Nick Wilding
01:19:40
....so....are we also in recovery from addictions to oil, consumerism, ways to numb out ..... and is community recovery another framing that is helpful?
David Coleman
01:19:52
Yes, that’s a trap: trying to be spotless and waiting until you are before you start doing anything
John Sturrock
01:20:15
A useful just published companion book to Alastair’s is Greed is Dead by the economists Paul Collier and John Kay, making a compelling case for a return to community and communitarianism as the antidote to individualism, narcissism and economic self interest.
Mary MacCallum Sullivan
01:21:04
New post-Covid localising that will reduce air and road miles; a new ‘self-sufficiency’ of nations and regions to reduce emissions and develop community?
Margaret Sutherland
01:21:14
Are you optimistic that younger generations (thinking particularly under 18) might be different? Covid, lower life expectancy, generations not becoming “better off” than the previous one, a possible shift in the exam system given what’s happening in the UK(!!)…….might these things shift them towards community?
Joe Lafferty
01:22:33
Perhaps its languages Nick, but i don't see it as recovery in the sense of addiction, but something much deeper and not dealing with toxicity but rather re-discover something deeply inate at the core of our being? Becoming more human
Nick Wilding
01:23:03
yes!
nick stewart
01:24:05
Roger Hallam is a harbinger of Eco terrorism.
Svenja Meyerricks
01:24:06
False satisfiers can also give rise of people seeking community in the wrong places, and give rise to the fascist currents we're witnessing now, including ecofascism. The latter may become a much more prominent threat as people's awareness of climate change rises but embodied knowing about trauma doesn't?
David Coleman
01:24:28
Yes, you can’t be angry every day of your life.
Sarah Ogletree
01:24:49
Nick & Joe: Becoming more human certainly resonates with me. Makes me think of the Christian theologian Norman Wirzba who writes about the need for humanity to embrace our "creatureliness"
Joe Lafferty
01:24:52
What do you mean Nick Stewart? Could you say a little more?
Helen Jeans
01:24:56
I find trauma a more compelling and scientific explanation than ''individualism, narcissism and economic self interest'' of our current human condition.
Mary MacCallum Sullivan
01:25:00
There must be revolution, but a revolution of kindness?
Helen Jeans
01:25:32
A revolution of hope too?
Svenja Meyerricks
01:25:44
@Helen could trauma be the root, the others the symptoms?
Joe Lafferty
01:25:44
Lovely Sarah!
David Coleman
01:25:54
Especially of hope, not waiting for permission for hope!
Kat Jones (SCCS)
01:26:05
Thank you Alastair for all the plugs! Just a reminder to look at the website https://climatefringe.org/
Lucy Mertekis
01:26:46
Here's the link to buy your copy of the book: https://bit.ly/BirlinnRiders (includes overseas)
Helen Jeans
01:26:47
@Svenja - yes! but it is important to name the cause
Marian Pallister
01:26:47
Mary MacCallum Sullivan - revolution of kindness but also of respect?
Mary MacCallum Sullivan
01:26:50
Hope is not strong enough; I find an element of despair in the question of hope. I am confident that we can do this.
nick stewart
01:26:50
@JoeLafferty extremist, absolutist ideologies lead to violence. we’ve seen this over and over agin since the 1960s.
Joe Lafferty
01:27:18
Thanks Nick, that’s much clearer. Appreciate hearing your perspective.
Nick Wilding
01:27:53
we are appreciating your hosting thank you :)
John Gillies
01:28:23
Thank you Alastair and Alison; I look forward very much to reading the book….
Richard Murray
01:28:36
Hasn’t the alarmists’ prophecies been disproved by the human reaction to the pandemic crisis ‘love of neighbour’ etc that we CAN work together to combat threats to human life?
Lucy Mertekis
01:28:42
Thank you all for this wonderful chat!
Christine Campbell
01:28:47
Thanks
Sarah Ogletree
01:28:54
Mary, I hear what you're saying about hope. I also do think processing and making room for grief and despair can be helpful for sustaining the kind of activism needed in this moment. For me, this is where ritual and spirituality come in!
José Luis Bermudez
01:28:59
Thank you Alastair !!!
Sarah Ogletree
01:29:01
Thank you all!
Joe Lafferty
01:29:08
Thanks everyone - great talk, dialogue and questions / dialouge in the chat. Insighrul and stimulating!
Laura Hope-Gill
01:29:09
I am excited to teach Riders on the Storm this term! Thank you!
David Coleman
01:29:10
be hopeful, even if no grounds for optimism!!
Helen Jeans
01:29:17
Great to connect with CHE again!
Christine Redhead
01:29:53
So glad I joined, it was fascinating. Looking forward to reading the book. Off to put my grandchildren to bed. (Chris Redhead)
Kevin Frediani
01:29:53
Thank you Alastair it has been wonderful to listen to your explore your journey and how you birth this community message to us all
Julie Christie
01:30:07
I’m so glad I joined the book launch and can’t wait to get “dug in” to the book with a dram! Cheers Alastair and Alison for this launch.
Matthew Hopwood
01:30:35
thank you Alistair for all your energy and endeavour and the gift of this creation x x blessings
David Somervell
01:30:38
Thanks to all the team that set this up and helped Alastair share some of his visions! Important stuff! And also to lovely, erudite and thought provoking hosting by Alison!
Mary MacCallum Sullivan
01:30:43
To accompany is a very strong value and strategy!
Joe Lafferty
01:30:46
Will the recording be made available Alison?
Jen Stout
01:30:57
It’s not sufficient though to just condemn ‘extremists’. Need to understand why they feel no other option left. I used to feel very similar - as did many friends in the ‘direct action’, scene - property damage, trying to shut down coal power stations etc - because we felt it was proportionate and that other avenues had utterly failed (re. climate, weapons manufacture, etc).
Svenja Meyerricks
01:31:20
Appreciating your hosting too Alison!
Mary MacCallum Sullivan
01:31:41
Condemnless, understand more, Jen…!
Carol Bradley
01:32:09
Thank you all. Alastair for writing; others for support!
déirdre ní mhathúna
01:32:29
Meal do naidheachd Alastair. I very much look forward to reading the book. I am thinking about our Lewis friends and how they and many other small communities of the Highlands can and will contribute to the warp and weft of resilience and deep renewal.
Lucy Mertekis
01:34:20
One final wee link to the book - cheers all! https://bit.ly/BirlinnRiders
Joe Lafferty
01:34:38
Hi Lucy, will the recording be made available?
Sarah Laurenson
01:34:56
Thank you Alastair (& co). Sadly have to head off. Cheers - enjoy the dram!
Kat Jones (SCCS)
01:35:01
Thank you Alison you have been an amazing host and I have loved your thoughts and fantastic contribution!
Lucy Mertekis
01:35:02
We'll email all attendees a link to the recording afterwards once it's available
Marian Pallister
01:35:06
Thank you everyone. Best wishes for the book. MY connection is now unstable, so I may leave.
Joe Lafferty
01:35:32
Will recording be made availalbe?
Margaret Sutherland
01:36:03
Yes I’m here
Fiona Haworth
01:36:13
Thank you, so much richness to think about.
Luke Devlin
01:36:14
Thanks to all, was great to hear from those who are connected with CHE who are attending. I believe the recording will be made available shortly
Luke Concannon
01:36:17
Thank you for a lovely gathering!
Lucy Mertekis
01:36:21
Hi Joe yes the recording will be available after the event - we'll email all attendees.
Joe Lafferty
01:36:41
Thanks Lucy!!
Wendy Fyfe
01:36:44
Thank you and wild blessings
Helen Jeans
01:42:05
I find many people in their 20s to have a emotional and global intelligence I don't think my friends or I had... I feel there is something new and different in them already...
David Somervell
01:42:39
++ Helen
Margaret Sutherland
01:43:39
Thank you Alastair. I think intergenerational work is hugely important. I love the weaving analogy! I agree @Helen about their understanding of certain things being different and possibly deeper
Sarah Ogletree
01:44:20
I agree about intergenerational work and also love the weaving analogy!
Jane Lewis
01:44:20
Thanks so much. Really looking forward to reading the book - collecting a copy from our local bookshop tomorrow!
Margaret Sutherland
01:45:58
Scotland is trying to become a trauma informed nation. I wonder what impact that might have?
Todd LeVasseur
01:48:32
Alastair, it seems that our politics (at least in the US) is by definition, given what you just said, not a politics of friendship. So how do we square away the need for community and friendship, with a politics of hostility (and with Trump, active disenfranchisement)?
Carol Henry
01:49:14
Glad I managed to come along.. Afraid I have to go but hope to connect again.. sounds like a great book!!
Andrew Smith
01:49:52
I have to leave now but wanted to express my gratitude to all for a such a interesting, enlightening and hopeful evening. I look forward to watching the rest of the discussion on the recording later and to reading Riders on the Storm.
Svenja Meyerricks
01:50:34
Thanks Alastair!
David Somervell
01:51:35
Alastair mentions drawing on Bhuddist teachings … if these speak to you you might enjoy a Retreat this Saturday in the Plum Village tradition drawing on Thich Nhat Hahn/s “Love Letter to the Earth” https://augretreat.eventbrite.co.uk
David Coleman
01:52:13
Alastair: in the book: you many times suggest a reader might skip a chapter or two: which chapter would you rather they really did not skip?
Sarah Ogletree
01:52:21
Todd: Your question makes me think particularly about about the book Watershed Discipleship edited by Ched Myers. Thinking about place-based response to social and ecological justice.
nick stewart
01:52:31
The film, The Act of Killing is evidence that there are people who will never feel bad about mistreating - and killing - others. There are people in power who are serious sociopaths who are only going to change through implacable resistance?
Kevin Frediani
01:53:00
I am reminded the concept of a right of passage to mark the transition from youth to adulthood. The investment between generations in sharing knowledge, giving space. Giving time, helping provide the breadth of experiences our youths experience, while helping them explore for themselves the golden threads of knowledge gained by asking questions and answering for themselves. I am also aware from my own life without an intergenerational right of passage, where I had to make the transition from youth to adulthood within a peer group with all the risk that brings. While finally, I reflect on the challange in this age to be the best parent and steward to my children. Trying to survive and make space and time in modern busy world. Ensuring my own children had a sense of shared journeying with me and our kin. Then when there time arrived making time and space to witness their transition into the world where their voice and sense of right in being in community as a contributor to placemaking has been made.
Gisela Creed
01:54:08
Thank you Alastair, amazing work , I keep learning
Ninian Stuart
01:55:27
Really inspired by A&A’s reflections on Scottish traditions of hospitality & fostering. Bonds of milk stronger than bonds of blood. & remembering that PNG folk talk of “mama blood” & “mama true”. As one of the few who have inherited land, and living/working with Q of how to share & pass it on in a right, fair & true way, I am moved by the potential of inheritance being passed down the line in a true way, through those who really show up to hold the burden & share the harvest as EVEN more important than the blood line. But how can make the leap in a way that does not deny our ancestors - good & bad, right & wrong, rich & poor?
Diana Toynbee
01:56:35
Libation!
Evan Harrel
01:56:52
cheers
David Somervell
01:57:31
++ Ninian
Iain Mackenzie
01:57:35
Slainte Mhor Alastair, well deserved.
Jennifer Leiper
01:59:10
Slainte everyone! Thank you Alistair and hosts.
Iain Mackenzie
01:59:24
Lots of interesting ideas, now looking forward to get stuck into the book.
Sarah Ogletree
02:00:32
So true, Todd
Catriona McIntosh
02:02:41
Completely agree Todd. A politics of focusing on the individual and not the connection with other. But also, I wonder if this links to the mask issue. And that most white men are not used to having others control or make decisions about what they can and can’t do with their bodies
Jan Smith
02:03:10
So much to think about. Thank you everyone.
Ella Gillies
02:04:06
Trump also had a father who contributed negatively to his psyche according to his Niece Mary Trump in her book. His influence seemed more malign than his passive mother according to this book.
Chris Fremantle
02:04:32
I came across the idea of ‘unconditional positive regard’ in a book by a cousin training to be a mental health nurse… is ‘unconditional positive regard’ what you are talking about?
nick stewart
02:04:49
trump and authoritarianism? Not necessarily violence - but implacable resistance - Ghandian.
Simon Barrow
02:05:17
This is tough. But while operating from the heartlands of friendship and the work of love, I think we still have to face up to the fact that there are forces (and politicians) who have to be defeated. Noam Chomsky has aid recently, “I want you to vote for Joe Biden and then haunt my dreams.” Cornel West has said: “Biden is a neoliberal disaster, Trump is a neofascits catastrophe. In a swing state I’ll vote for a neoliberal disaster… and take the struggle from there.” How do we marry love and struggle?
Réamonn Ó Ciaráin
02:05:33
Thanks Alastair & Alison, Luke, Kat et al. for carrying out this vital work - the work of poets worthy of that name - Gura fada buan sibh - beannachtaí ó Ard Mhacha.
nick stewart
02:05:58
Spirituality is micro - resistance is macro?
Sarah Ogletree
02:07:49
"How do we marry love and struggle?" Beautifully put, Simon.
Chriss Bull
02:07:50
Kia ora Alistair, and everyone. Thank you Alistair, for sharing more of your beautifu deep work. Looking forward to reading the book, and receiving this Zoom recording. Have to go - but what a way to start my day here in Aotearoa! Nga mihi nui, aroha atu, Chriss x
Helen Jeans
02:08:36
`Have to go now. Thank you do much for the questions and reflections. It is raining at last in Oxford.
John Sturrock
02:09:09
Now that the book is published, what most worries you about the way it might be received? What responses would give you concern?
David Coleman
02:11:37
Yes, its really good up=-to date homework
Margaret Sutherland
02:12:05
I have to go but tapadh leibh Alastair and Alison.
David Coleman
02:13:11
Yes, the whole “library: is worthwhile
Elizabeth Wainwright
02:13:48
We have to go — but thank you Alastair, Alison and team! The book arrived today and we’re looking forward to reading it x
Sarah Ogletree
02:13:51
I'm so excited about reading this text and using it with the faith communities I work with in the United States (southern Appalachia). Place/community are central to resilience, how we advocate for mitigation, and how we adapt--in order to not only survive, but to show up for each other with love. Thank you, Alastair for this resource.
Wallace Heim
02:13:51
Thank you, Alastair. A delight to hear you and swim in your ideas for a while. Thanks, Alison. And how wonderful it is to see CHE friends, and everyone. xxxx
David Coleman
02:14:36
You keep us awake with the comparison between CO2 and alcohol in the bloodstream!
Simon Barrow
02:14:53
That;’s great, Sarah. :)
Iain Mackenzie
02:15:06
Can you arrange launch e-drams Alastair?
Joe Lafferty
02:15:32
Ha ha, e-drams, I'm in!
Adam Howard
02:15:59
I have to go now, but many thanks for a truly inspiring gathering, Alastair, Alison and everyone. Adam
Nick Wilding
02:16:48
bye Adam....lovely to see you
Ella Gillies
02:17:52
Tapadh Leibh Alastair. Thoroughly enjoyed this discussion. Looking forward to reading your book.
Joe Lafferty
02:19:12
I need to go too - what a wonderful event. Despite the limitations of virtual meeting, real warmth, humour, friendship as well as respectful dialogue not to mention great input and hosting from Alistair and Alison. Thanks to everyone! Warm regards, Joe
Hilly Raphael
02:19:18
You mentioned ritual, memory and prayer - what is the connection? and what is the call? Thank you for all of this and looking forward to reading.
Kevin Frediani
02:22:15
thanks you all for your time and energy tonight. I have to go while look forward to reading the book and feeling part of a wider community
Sarah Ogletree
02:22:21
Yes. Thank you, David!
Kat Jones (SCCS)
02:23:13
Thanks Alison - the review is here: https://climatefringe.org/riders-on-the-storm/
Todd LeVasseur
02:25:32
Thanks, Alastair, and all. In solidarity, Todd
Diana Toynbee
02:29:56
Thank you Alastair; thank you Alison; thank you all. Looking forward to reading the book. Night night all.
Sarah Ogletree
02:34:32
Beautiful.
Steve Matthews
02:37:05
Bless you and thank you. Alistair. Do feel free to suggest to us what we should be doing around the time of COP26 next year, and until then. :) x
Steven Willett
02:37:41
In ancestor worship one is also helping their next rebirth. The ethical consequences of our actions extend throughout all universes, survive death and give rise to our next rebirth. My original spirituality came from the 12th to 15th century Yoruba.
Ninian Stuart
02:38:57
Aye…Revolution, devolution & evolution - the greatest of these is evolution
Kat Jones
02:39:17
such fantatsic questions and answers here. and such a feeling of connection.
Ninian Stuart
02:40:45
the living web of connection - here now - here and there - in all or some of its beautiful diversity
David Coleman
02:43:04
It’s real, but by digital means, tonight
Sarah Ogletree
02:44:15
Thank you for that reminder, Alastair
Rory MacPhee
02:44:24
the story of the Glasgow hutters feels an apt metaphor. socialist walking groups on a Saturday going from Glasgow to Carbeth. One year a tent, next year a tent with a ply floor, the next a shack and the next a Hut. squatting, now landowning
Verene Nicolas
02:44:36
yes good one
Kat Jones
02:47:24
and such an answer that was!
Simon Barrow
02:47:40
Thank you so much!
Sarah Ogletree
02:47:52
Thank you all. It was wonderful to join you from North Carolina.
Paul Bennett
02:47:57
Thank you so much for doing this online.
Ninian Stuart
02:48:38
Great stuff Rory - and love the work you are on
Luke Devlin
02:48:44
Reminders: 1) Buy your copy direct from Birlinn: https://bit.ly/BirlinnRiders (includes overseas)2) Opus Earth video of the book (5 mins): https://bit.ly/riders-storm-video3) Centre for Human Ecology reading group, 7 pm each Thursday in September: https://bit.ly/RidersCHE4) Climate Fringe’s diary of events for COP26: https://climatefringe.org/
David Coleman
02:48:58
This is already a great contribution to 3rd Millennium Christianity
Alison Phipps
02:49:57
absolutely Verene
Ninian Stuart
02:50:23
Am loving the way the women are showing up now - strong and powerful -
Rory MacPhee
02:50:29
sending 💚🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿🌲 from Fife. the fairies are gathering wearing galoshes and carrying paddles for the currach of Hope 💚🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿🌲
Catherine Canning
02:50:47
Thank you - wonderful!!
Gail Davidson
02:51:05
what a gift - such nourishment for the soul - thank you
Chris Fremantle
02:52:35
Thank you all
David Coleman
02:52:43
Yes, apocalyptic is our spiritual resource for this crisis.
Carol Bradley
02:52:49
Thank you thank you all.
Catherine Canning
02:56:53
Beautiful holding Alison
Jacqueline Macleod
02:56:54
thank you all
David A. McKay
02:56:59
Thank you all, and to Alastair!
Kat Jones
02:57:06
a beautiful way to end this extraordinary discussion. thank you so much.
Fiona Haworth
02:57:21
Wonderful, thank you.
Narya Ingram
02:57:39
Thanks for the insightful discussion, Alastair! Looking forward to reading some of your books for a class with Laura Hope-Gill this semester.
Kat Jones
02:59:00
goodbye all
Anna Munro
02:59:04
thank you! ( Anna)
Nick Wilding
02:59:25
nite nite....lots of love....
Amreeta Graham
02:59:35
Inspirational!
Anne Winther
02:59:42
bless you and thank you
Natasha Lloyd
02:59:56
Thank you.
Helen Shaw
03:00:58
thank you for a fascinating and inspiring discussion. Goodnight
Svenja Meyerricks
03:01:39
Thanks all and goodnight!
Nick Wilding
03:02:06
all is very well.... thank you
Natasha Lloyd
03:07:24
Thank you for being so real tonight. I’m going to go before you want me to speak! :-)